Hands on: Panasonic Viera TX-P50VT20 review (3D TV)

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metalqueen
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Hands on: Panasonic Viera TX-P50VT20 review (3D TV)

Post by metalqueen »

Hands on: Panasonic Viera TX-P50VT20 review (3D TV)
First look at the new best-in-class
by James Rivington

The Panasonic Viera TX-P50VT20 will be the very first 3D TV to hit UK shores and it's a masterpiece.

We got our first look at the £2,000 3D TV at Panasonic's annual launch event in Munich this week - it's certainly a great-looking set, and well-specified too.

Panasonic struck a panel-sharing deal with Pioneer at the beginning of last year – a deal which included a Pioneer promise to hand over the patents protecting its own market-leading but now extinct Kuro plasmas.

Rumour has it that these new 2010 NeoPDP plasmas are the first Panasonic TVs to come sprinkled with that Pioneer magic. Certainly, the 'Infinite Black Pro' label and a 5,000,000:1 native contrast ratio would indicate this.
Read the whole story here: http://www.techradar.com/news/televisio ... tv--671155" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
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Re: Hands on: Panasonic Viera TX-P50VT20 review (3D TV)

Post by DmitryKo »

£2000 (US $3100) for TX-P50VT20 sounds good, considering that previous-generation Panasonic TX-P50V10 retail for around £1500 in the UK (US $2300).

Here are Danish MSRP prices:
•TX-P65VT20 (65") DK 39 999 (US $7350)
•TX-P50VT20 (50") DK 19 999 (US $3700)
•TX-P50V20 (50") DK 15 999 (US $2950)
•TX-P42V20 (42") DK 12 999 (US $2400)

25% price premuim for the 3D technology is quite reasonable, thankfully not even close to ridiculous Japanese pricing.

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Re: Hands on: Panasonic Viera TX-P50VT20 review (3D TV)

Post by Kamus »

DmitryKo wrote:25% price premuim for the 3D technology is quite reasonable
I disagree. If you think about it, plasmas have been able to achieve really high refresh rates for a very long time. So 25% just so you can scan at higher rates seems like a very steep premium to me.
At least i hope there's improvement in other areas, rather than just saying that a higher refresh rate is some sort of new thing. When, if they really wanted to, they could've had a 120Hz input for years now. (they have 240-600 Mhz outputs already on those plasmas...)

Then again, i don't see the prices holding up for very long, competition is simply too strong for prices to hold.

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DmitryKo
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Re: Hands on: Panasonic Viera TX-P50VT20 review (3D TV)

Post by DmitryKo »

Kamus wrote:If you think about it, plasmas have been able to achieve really high refresh rates for a very long time. So 25% just so you can scan at higher rates seems like a very steep premium to me
"600 Hz sub-field drive" has nothing to do with picture refresh rates, it's just some gimmick related to the way plasma displays work, that is controlling brightness with pulse-width modulation in each subpixel. It's not that the display shows 600 different frames per each second. I do agree that true 120 Hz rates are more easy to implement on plasmas than on LCDs, but it's not entirely free; we all knew that first full-resolution 3D TV sets will carry a certain price premuim, and 25% premium in MSRP price is not really that much.

BTW I've seen a handful of high-end TV sets and all I really noticed in these "image enhancing" technologies are ridiculous amounts of noise reduction and unsharp masking, nothing more; that's the same trick they use to convince people that cheap dozen-megapixel compact photo cameras with tiny image sensors can produce sharp, noise-free pictures.

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