Visual Anomalies

By March 14, 2010March 24th, 2020Game Sertification

Here is our current official list of visual anomalies that can prevent certification:

  • Inability to have a combination of depth and pop-out effects entirely.
  • Background (e.g. mountains, sky, buildings) is visually locked or at the wrong depth.
  • Unplayable interface when reasonable stereoscopic 3D settings are found.
  • Objects or effects are doubling inappropriately.
  • Objects or effects are disappearing or flickering.
  • Objects or effects are drawn at the wrong depth.
  • Shadows are flickering.
  • Shadows are drawn improperly and look like 3D objects.
  • Shadows float at the wrong depth.
  • Light sources are drawn at the wrong depth.
  • Alternating camera positions create uncomfortable stereo settings.
  • The crosshair is not pointing where you are shooting and/or there is no working alternative to stereoscopic 3D game crosshair.

We are allowing a maximum of two visual anomalies provided that they do not distract from the joy of the game or hinder the ability to play fairly and competitively with other players.

The following are visual anomaly exceptions that will not impact certification:

  1. Ghosting – This refers to cross-talk or an imperfection in the ability for the stereoscopic hardware to completely filter the left and right sided image for each eye. This is a limitation of the stereoscopic hardware solution, and will not impact certification.
  2. Inaccurate Crosshair – One of the biggest challenges of converting a 2D image into a stereoscopic 3D space is that the aiming crosshair can become inaccurate. This anomaly will be excused provided that the stereoscopic hardware has a working crosshair or laser-sight alternative built into its driver.
  3. Anomaly is Present in Less Than 5% of Game Play – The majority of games that go through the certification process will either work or fail almost immediately. Unfortunately, there will be situations where an anomaly can turn up after hours of play or in very select instances. While we hope that a future driver revision or game software update will correct the problem, we think anomalies like this will not hinder the overall gaming experience, and can be excused in this revision of our certification guidelines.

Anomaly & Certification Relationship Examples

MTBS Native

The game is programmed to natively support all MTBS participating consumer stereoscopic 3D solutions or more, and does not require a special stereoscopic 3D driver to run. This would be an MTBS Native Certification.

MTBS Platinum

The game works equally well with the iZ3D and NVIDIA drivers, and all game settings can be maximized without easily noticeable visual anomalies. This would be an MTBS Platinum-A Certification.

The game works equally well with the iZ3D and NVIDIA drivers, but requires the gamer to turn off post processing effects or other settings(s) to play in S-3D. This would be an MTBS Platinum-B Certification.

The game works equally well with the iZ3D and NVIDIA drivers, it may or may not require reduced settings, but there are occasional visual anomalies that are deemed acceptable for stereoscopic 3D play. For example, one or two movie sequences look a bit off in the middle of the game. This would be an MTBS Platinum-C Certification.

MTBS Gold

The game works with either the iZ3D or NVIDIA drivers, and all game settings can be maximized without easily noticeable visual anomalies. This would be an MTBS Gold-A Certification.

The game works with either the iZ3D or NVIDIA drivers, but requires shadows to be turned off to play in S-3D and/or other setting(s). This would be an MTBS Gold-B Certification.

The game works with either the iZ3D or NVIDIA drivers, it may or may not require reduced settings, but there are visual anomalies that are deemed acceptable for stereoscopic 3D play. An example could be a heads up display element that doubles inappropriately in one eye. This would be an MTBS Gold-C Certification.

Leave a Reply