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MTBS3D RT @GetImmersed: Dr. Ofer Shai is the Director of Omnia AI at @DeloitteCanada. He talked about the misconceptions about #ArtificialIntellig
MTBS3D RT @GetImmersed: The use of #futurecomputing in #healthcare was one of the prominent tracks at #Immersed2018, and we got to see some really…
MTBS3D RT @GetImmersed: Ricardo Wagner, Director of Product Marketing for #Office365 at @microsoftcanada, talked about their efforts to make moder…
MTBS3D RT @GetImmersed: Pascal Langlois, Founder of Collective Intent, talks about the potential of using motion capture technologies to re-enable…
MTBS3D RT @GetImmersed: David Parker, Founder of @teamwishplay, talked at #Immersed2018 about how they are using #immersivetechnologies like #Virt
MTBS3D RT @GetImmersed: Richard Huddy, Head of the Game Ecosystem at the Samsung Research Institute (UK), was the second keynote at #Immersed2018.…
MTBS3D RT @GetImmersed: .@JoanneAska, Co-Founder of @TribeOfPan, talks about @TheChoice_VR their innovative #VR project that addresses the topic o…
MTBS3D .@ArozziChairs makes high-end #gaming chairs and tables. Scott Nishi, Sales Manager for Arozzi, spoke to us at… https://t.co/4U4LyU1SJn
MTBS3D .@pimaxofficial interview from #CES2019 includes news about their latest #5K and #8K #HMDs, eye tracking and new co… https://t.co/mmgw69jRTa
MTBS3D .@HP unleashes the #VR dinosaurs at #CES2019. 🦕 🦖 https://t.co/Ufed2K99F5 https://t.co/Rd5irCXzMZ
MTBS3D Today’s interview is with Jan Ludvig from @SenseArena. Jan was a professional #NHL #hockey player. He talked about… https://t.co/3fT7zWGmyI
MTBS3D Chia Chin Lee of, CEO of @BigBoxVR talks Population One at #CES2019. #VR #eSports https://t.co/xfIWYboVkQ https://t.co/3pW2AEPaxG
MTBS3D At #CES2019 we met with Rikard Steiber, President of #HTCViveport, and he talked about their new @htcvive Pro Eye,… https://t.co/WjugF0l5gJ
MTBS3D We met with Ryan McCall, Director of Strategy and Business Development for @UL_Benchmarks at #CES2019. He talked ab… https://t.co/lo8HZkYs5p
MTBS3D .@OmronAutomation talked about their ping pong playing robot at #CES2019. 🏓🤖 #Robotics #technologyhttps://t.co/SvdLiCYlbZ
MTBS3D MSI showcased their latest 17" GS75 Stealth laptop computer and talked about the availability of #VR readiness in t… https://t.co/3UrISM7nWK

What if Daydream Can go BEYOND Mobile?

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Ahah!  Some very positive news out of the Google I/O conference.  Partnered with companies like HTC and Lenovo, new stand-alone mobile virtual reality devices are expected to be released towards the end of 2017.  More than this, unlike the current cream of the crop mobile options like the Samsung Gear VR or Google's own Daydream VR smartphone combos, these new stand-alone VR products will be mobile solutions that feature positional tracking; the same type of tracking that captures every nuance of how the user is moving his/her head.  Will positional controllers follow?  We think that's a safe bet.

A stand-alone VR device means that all the processing power is embedded in the HMD itself, and it's not necessary to be connected to a PC or combined with a smartphone to make the experience possible.  The HMDs will likely (hopefully) be affordable, and will benefit from a big convenience factor.  Another advantage is that by being a stand-alone device, these new HMDs qualify as a platform where content makers have reasonable confidence in the spec and know that all the devices will have comparable performance and behaviour.


Here's the catch...and a potential solution.  The catch is that mobile is mobile, and the processing power is likely at least 10 years apart from the top graphics experience we enjoy on PC.  Since performance capabilities are a moving target on both platforms, the two sides never meet.  What this means is that while the VR experience could be impressive (and we are confident it will be), if they are using a mobile or smartphone class GPU, the result will be generations apart from what PC and console have to offer.

Now here's the conspiracy theory potential solution.  We are now entering a phase of wireless HMDs.  How big a leap is it for the wireless output of a PC's display signal and tracking signals to be linked to a mobile HMD device?  Now that the smartphone is no longer a hindrance, it's just a display with choice electronics, right?  Factoring in that HTC and Lenovo are each well seated in the PC space, is it in their power to kill two birds with one stone?  Think of the potential of a personal HMD device that seamlessly switches from one platform to the next.  One HMD that offers you a choice of mobile or PC back-end; each with their own OS and platform.  Google gets mobile, PC gets Windows with related store fronts.

We're not privy to any secret sauces or anything; this just seems like an obvious opportunity.  If not for this first generation, maybe the next.