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MTBS3D RT @GetImmersed: We’re moving to Silicon Valley! @IfcSummit November 5 & 6, 2019 at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, CA. Call…
MTBS3D Julien Le Corre, Lead Developer at @InnerspaceVR , talked about their latest #VR escape room title The Corsair's Cu… https://t.co/uuOT6SG0NA
MTBS3D As fun as Arizona Sunshine is in traditional #VR, @Vertigo_Games took it up a notch by transforming it into a locat… https://t.co/YkGpv2wLMM
MTBS3D .@OfficialGDC would not be complete without visiting SVVR's annual #VR Mixer! In today's interview, we catch up wi… https://t.co/hibivrbYdq
MTBS3D Spencer Jackson, Software Engineer at @NordicTrack, talks about their latest iFit #VR Bike paired with an #HTCVivehttps://t.co/5b2uD9Hoa9
MTBS3D William Provancher is the CEO of @TacticalHaptics. He demonstrated their latest haptics controllers for us in this… https://t.co/Ir1Cog8bRI
MTBS3D Gaspar Ferreiro is the CEO of Project Ghost Studios. In this interview, he talks about their new Project Ghost dem… https://t.co/T2xz1VdtGI
MTBS3D .@EpicGames had loads of news to share at @OfficialGDC. Marc Petit is the General Manager of #Epic's @UnrealEnginehttps://t.co/CnqpGAB2f4
MTBS3D Chris Hook, Graphics & Visual Technologies Marketing Chief for @intel spoke to us during @OfficialGDC. We talked ab… https://t.co/ji6AKJpfwM
MTBS3D We interviewed @networknextinc at #GDC2019. They are in the business of ensuring the best connectivity and lowest l… https://t.co/87b06uMAm7
MTBS3D .@reality_clash is a developing #AugmentedReality combat game. We got to interview Tony Pearce, the CCO and Co-Fou… https://t.co/24P5kLz0Ef
MTBS3D Robots explode at #GDC2019 with @FuturLab. They have a new title for #PSVR called Mini Mech Mayhem. #GDC19https://t.co/JiIuJgGZ64
MTBS3D .@zerolatencyVR has a number of #VR out-of-home entertainment centers around the world, and we got to catch up with… https://t.co/NZJBVyRUWz
MTBS3D RT @GetImmersed: Dr. Ofer Shai is the Director of Omnia AI at @DeloitteCanada. He talked about the misconceptions about #ArtificialIntellig
MTBS3D RT @GetImmersed: The use of #futurecomputing in #healthcare was one of the prominent tracks at #Immersed2018, and we got to see some really…
MTBS3D RT @GetImmersed: Ricardo Wagner, Director of Product Marketing for #Office365 at @microsoftcanada, talked about their efforts to make moder…
MTBS3D RT @GetImmersed: Pascal Langlois, Founder of Collective Intent, talks about the potential of using motion capture technologies to re-enable…

Impacto & Tesla Suit Making the Rounds

Novint Falcon
Honest to goodness, the one thing that really needs drastic improvement is haptics. It's a big challenge that effective force-feedback needs a solid base like a table or a wall because the sensation of resistance is everything. To date, our favorite consumer-grade haptics device is the Novint Falcon. Placed on a table and held with your fist or by a gun mount, its internal motors accurately recreated physical textures like ice and sticky goo or slapped your hand back as your gun or weapon went off. Every nuance was easily recreated or imagined (for weapons or tools that don't exist in real life). It's frustrating that the company went belly-up shortly after we reviewed their product and I was left personally hooked.

A Novint Falcon recreation might do ok for a seated VR experience (though that too would have limitations), effective haptics need to be a lot more mobile to be both convincing and compatible with modern virtual reality.

Fortunately, we are starting to see new interest in haptics.


A team at the Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) lab at Germany’s Hasso Plattner Institute have developed a prototype they call "Impacto". Demonstrated on an arm, it works by stimulating a contact point with a vibration, and also stimulating the muscle with an electric pulse. The closest comparable would be an electric muscle stimulator (think "Dr. Ho"). In this case, the goal is to force your muscles to contract so your limbs will bend at the right time. The above shows the Impacto forcing your arms to react by forcing the muscle to contract ("Stop punching yourself! Why are you punching yourself?!? Stop Punching Yourself!").


Tesla Studios is promising a Tesla Suit that lets you feel tactile feedback and temperature change. It also includes motion capture where needed. According to their website, this is a module-based suit that is customized according to what you need. While the haptics work by stimulating muscle groups with electric pulses, the other features are not well explained. They most recently did a PR stint of transmitting a hug from one user to another which is a bit too lovey dovey for my tastes. For a real haptics test, I want to see the users getting slapped around a little or maybe having things drawn on one user's back and seeing if the other could identify it. Maybe my expectations are too high; I just think that feeling texture and force is everything. The Tesla Suit is gearing up for a Kickstarter.

In any case, what's good to see is haptics are beginning to be taken seriously again. Let's see where things go!