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MTBS3D RT @GetImmersed: Dr. Ofer Shai is the Director of Omnia AI at @DeloitteCanada. He talked about the misconceptions about #ArtificialIntellig
MTBS3D RT @GetImmersed: The use of #futurecomputing in #healthcare was one of the prominent tracks at #Immersed2018, and we got to see some really…
MTBS3D RT @GetImmersed: Ricardo Wagner, Director of Product Marketing for #Office365 at @microsoftcanada, talked about their efforts to make moder…
MTBS3D RT @GetImmersed: Pascal Langlois, Founder of Collective Intent, talks about the potential of using motion capture technologies to re-enable…
MTBS3D RT @GetImmersed: David Parker, Founder of @teamwishplay, talked at #Immersed2018 about how they are using #immersivetechnologies like #Virt
MTBS3D RT @GetImmersed: Richard Huddy, Head of the Game Ecosystem at the Samsung Research Institute (UK), was the second keynote at #Immersed2018.…
MTBS3D RT @GetImmersed: .@JoanneAska, Co-Founder of @TribeOfPan, talks about @TheChoice_VR their innovative #VR project that addresses the topic o…
MTBS3D .@ArozziChairs makes high-end #gaming chairs and tables. Scott Nishi, Sales Manager for Arozzi, spoke to us at… https://t.co/4U4LyU1SJn
MTBS3D .@pimaxofficial interview from #CES2019 includes news about their latest #5K and #8K #HMDs, eye tracking and new co… https://t.co/mmgw69jRTa
MTBS3D .@HP unleashes the #VR dinosaurs at #CES2019. 🦕 🦖 https://t.co/Ufed2K99F5 https://t.co/Rd5irCXzMZ
MTBS3D Today’s interview is with Jan Ludvig from @SenseArena. Jan was a professional #NHL #hockey player. He talked about… https://t.co/3fT7zWGmyI
MTBS3D Chia Chin Lee of, CEO of @BigBoxVR talks Population One at #CES2019. #VR #eSports https://t.co/xfIWYboVkQ https://t.co/3pW2AEPaxG
MTBS3D At #CES2019 we met with Rikard Steiber, President of #HTCViveport, and he talked about their new @htcvive Pro Eye,… https://t.co/WjugF0l5gJ
MTBS3D We met with Ryan McCall, Director of Strategy and Business Development for @UL_Benchmarks at #CES2019. He talked ab… https://t.co/lo8HZkYs5p
MTBS3D .@OmronAutomation talked about their ping pong playing robot at #CES2019. 🏓🤖 #Robotics #technologyhttps://t.co/SvdLiCYlbZ
MTBS3D MSI showcased their latest 17" GS75 Stealth laptop computer and talked about the availability of #VR readiness in t… https://t.co/3UrISM7nWK

Who Reacts to a VR Tree Falling in the Forest?

Stanford Tree Cutting ExperimentIt sounds like a hokey premise; that VR can somehow instil behavioral changes in us to do great things for our environment - but what if our VR actions really do subconsciously influence our real life behavior?

Stanford University is starting to find the answers in their tree cutting study. Users go through the action of standing in a virtual reality forest with a mix of haptics and a VR display with surround audio. The user cuts down a tree and feels every chainsaw rumble as they do it. The result? According to Stanford, that VR experience will lead to a 20% drop in paper consumption and the subject will seek out recycled goods for the foreseeable future. In contrast, participants that just watch a video and read articles about deforestation will have a similar result, but the positive effect of taking on a more environmentally friendly path won't last more than a week.

If Stanford's results hold up, it would seem that living IS learning, and a lot of good could be achieved through this. At a minimum, this demonstrates that VR can influence in ways that other forms of media can't - or at least not as well.

If true, this is an excellent affirmation for military training, diplomacy, garnering empathy from others, education, simulations, serious games and countless other applications that are best suited for actually living out experiences for long term memory or behavioral change.

Here's the thing. The above speaks to designed experiences that are seeking purposeful changes in the way the subjects behave - hopefully for positive outcomes. With countless forms of VR content hitting the market whose only purpose is to entertain...what's the other side of the coin? Is it feasible that behaviours can change even though the entertainment had no intended ramifications beyond providing the user a good time?

The research is preliminary, and it's probable that certain conditions need to be met for effectiveness.  There may also be limitations on the types of behaviors that translate and how.  Still, this is an important consideration for when VR does become a mass market medium.