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MTBS3D RT @GetImmersed: We’re moving to Silicon Valley! @IfcSummit November 5 & 6, 2019 at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, CA. Call…
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MTBS3D As fun as Arizona Sunshine is in traditional #VR, @Vertigo_Games took it up a notch by transforming it into a locat… https://t.co/YkGpv2wLMM
MTBS3D .@OfficialGDC would not be complete without visiting SVVR's annual #VR Mixer! In today's interview, we catch up wi… https://t.co/hibivrbYdq
MTBS3D Spencer Jackson, Software Engineer at @NordicTrack, talks about their latest iFit #VR Bike paired with an #HTCVivehttps://t.co/5b2uD9Hoa9
MTBS3D William Provancher is the CEO of @TacticalHaptics. He demonstrated their latest haptics controllers for us in this… https://t.co/Ir1Cog8bRI
MTBS3D Gaspar Ferreiro is the CEO of Project Ghost Studios. In this interview, he talks about their new Project Ghost dem… https://t.co/T2xz1VdtGI
MTBS3D .@EpicGames had loads of news to share at @OfficialGDC. Marc Petit is the General Manager of #Epic's @UnrealEnginehttps://t.co/CnqpGAB2f4
MTBS3D Chris Hook, Graphics & Visual Technologies Marketing Chief for @intel spoke to us during @OfficialGDC. We talked ab… https://t.co/ji6AKJpfwM
MTBS3D We interviewed @networknextinc at #GDC2019. They are in the business of ensuring the best connectivity and lowest l… https://t.co/87b06uMAm7
MTBS3D .@reality_clash is a developing #AugmentedReality combat game. We got to interview Tony Pearce, the CCO and Co-Fou… https://t.co/24P5kLz0Ef
MTBS3D Robots explode at #GDC2019 with @FuturLab. They have a new title for #PSVR called Mini Mech Mayhem. #GDC19https://t.co/JiIuJgGZ64
MTBS3D .@zerolatencyVR has a number of #VR out-of-home entertainment centers around the world, and we got to catch up with… https://t.co/NZJBVyRUWz
MTBS3D RT @GetImmersed: Dr. Ofer Shai is the Director of Omnia AI at @DeloitteCanada. He talked about the misconceptions about #ArtificialIntellig
MTBS3D RT @GetImmersed: The use of #futurecomputing in #healthcare was one of the prominent tracks at #Immersed2018, and we got to see some really…
MTBS3D RT @GetImmersed: Ricardo Wagner, Director of Product Marketing for #Office365 at @microsoftcanada, talked about their efforts to make moder…
MTBS3D RT @GetImmersed: Pascal Langlois, Founder of Collective Intent, talks about the potential of using motion capture technologies to re-enable…

Oculus Rift Development Kit Review


Hardware

The Oculus Rift looks just as I expected : very plain with the exception of its signature bevelling and logo. The power adapter is modular, and comes with four plug attachments to guarantee its functionality around the globe. The B and C lens cups are neatly stacked in their own compartment next to the plug modules, and amongst the cords is a HDMI-to-DVI adapter.

Oculus Rift Development Kit
The eye cups twist out with some force, and to free them I had to delicately push on the plastic tabs that keep the lenses in place. I was a bit nervous during the process because one bad slip could scratch the lenses. The cups are smooth cast plastic which makes them too slippery for a good grip, so some knurling or a rougher texture would have been helpful. Removing the cups also exposes the screen, so make sure that you're in a clean environment - I had to remove them a second time to clear little crumbs of foam that fell in from the strap.

The control box is lightweight and unobtrusive. It's cast in the same plastic, and has the same bevelled pattern as the "face" of the rift. Unfortunately, it's permanently attached to the Rift. It would require a custom plug to disconnect it from the mainboard, so I understand why they did this. It has basic display controls on it: two buttons for contrast, two for brightness, and of course a single on/off switch. The buttons have a raised line on them which is helpful when trying to adjust setting while wearing the Rift.

The unit weighs a little more in my hand than I expected, having heard that it was as light as ski-goggles (it's not). Foam padding and adjustable straps trail off of it: functional but not attractive. The plastic is light and feels a bit...inexpensive... but honestly: this is an early development kit and this was to be expected. In every way, the Rift appears as a development model - the result of fast prototyping intended to get it into the hands of developers as fast as possible.

Oculus Rift Development Kit
The 7 inch LCD screen the Rift currently uses is actually a re-purposed smart-phone screen. With a total resolution of 1280x800, each eye is left with a resolution of only 640x800, creating the unique aspect ratio of 4:5. In addition to being a lower resolution, the nature of having the screen magnified by the lenses makes the pixel spacing noticeable AKA "the screen door effect".

Between the low resolution, the odd aspect, and the pixel grid, the display is not inherently pleasant to look at. The one improvement offered by the new screen; a faster switching time on pixels, does not do enough to counter the unpleasant pixel smear created by rapid movement. It's important to note that aside from weight, the current dev kit is a total improvement over the original demo kit. The head tracking, taken on its own, is excellent; it's snappy and precise, and is simply waiting for the screen to catch up with it.

An HD version is already making the rounds at trade shows and was debuted at this year's E3. With a 1080p screen, people who have had a hands on agree that the screen door effect is even further reduced. This is just a start though, the and the resolution specs of the consumer version remain to be seen.