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MTBS3D RT @tifcagroup: Enabling Breakthrough Innovations in the #ClienttoCloud Revolution. https://t.co/dglxcxLO3D
MTBS3D RT @tifcagroup: TIFCA’s Client-to-Cloud Vision document has been published. We are meeting during #SIGGRAPH2019 to jointly address the cont…
MTBS3D It’s been a major boon for the Client-to-Cloud Revolution at #E3. #E32019 #E319 #GoogleStadia #BethesdaE3https://t.co/IqIrR81D8o
MTBS3D RT @IfcSummit: Sixth International Future Computing Summit Moves to Silicon Valley November 5-6, 2019. Open Call for Visionary Speakers and…
MTBS3D RT @GetImmersed: We’re moving to Silicon Valley! @IfcSummit November 5 & 6, 2019 at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, CA. Call…
MTBS3D Julien Le Corre, Lead Developer at @InnerspaceVR , talked about their latest #VR escape room title The Corsair's Cu… https://t.co/uuOT6SG0NA
MTBS3D As fun as Arizona Sunshine is in traditional #VR, @Vertigo_Games took it up a notch by transforming it into a locat… https://t.co/YkGpv2wLMM
MTBS3D .@OfficialGDC would not be complete without visiting SVVR's annual #VR Mixer! In today's interview, we catch up wi… https://t.co/hibivrbYdq
MTBS3D Spencer Jackson, Software Engineer at @NordicTrack, talks about their latest iFit #VR Bike paired with an #HTCVivehttps://t.co/5b2uD9Hoa9
MTBS3D William Provancher is the CEO of @TacticalHaptics. He demonstrated their latest haptics controllers for us in this… https://t.co/Ir1Cog8bRI
MTBS3D Gaspar Ferreiro is the CEO of Project Ghost Studios. In this interview, he talks about their new Project Ghost dem… https://t.co/T2xz1VdtGI
MTBS3D .@EpicGames had loads of news to share at @OfficialGDC. Marc Petit is the General Manager of #Epic's @UnrealEnginehttps://t.co/CnqpGAB2f4
MTBS3D Chris Hook, Graphics & Visual Technologies Marketing Chief for @intel spoke to us during @OfficialGDC. We talked ab… https://t.co/ji6AKJpfwM
MTBS3D We interviewed @networknextinc at #GDC2019. They are in the business of ensuring the best connectivity and lowest l… https://t.co/87b06uMAm7

MTBS' VR Settings Guide




The Stereoscopic 3D Map

Before we talk about head mounted displays, it's important to understand how 3D monitors work. Here is a top view diagram of how your eyes interact with a virtual 3D video game environment with an S-3D display:

The Stereoscopic 3D Map

Circles "L" and "R" are your left and right eyes.

The "S" line is the virtual screen glass. Professionals call this "Zero Parallax", but we will call it the "Neutral Point" because everything behind this position appears in the distance, and everything in front of it is an out of screen effect and will appear to pop out at you! Lots of fun! This is a virtual line and is not representative of your monitor's physical screen location.

To make this easier to follow, symbol "D" refers to "distance", and "P" refers to "pop-out".

Let's see how everything relates!

First, the boxes all represent the same object, but from different 3D perspectives. Remember that when you are wearing 3D glasses, your left and right eyes each see a unique 2D image, and your brain combines the two to create the 3D experience. This diagram is showing what things look like without the 3D glasses on so you can follow the relationships.

Box "N" is your object at the "Neutral Point" or "Zero Parallax". If you were looking at this with your naked eye without 3D glasses, it would be a single box because there is absolutely no separation to create a 3D effect. If this was the only thing on the screen, it would appear to be 100% flat.

Box D(L) and Box D(R) is the same box with a space in the middle. This space is called "separation", and the 3D distance is determined by the amount of separation between D(L) and D(R). If you were wearing 3D glasses, your brain would take these two images, consider the separation between them, and create a deep 3D experience for you.

Notice how D(L) and D(R) are aligned with your left and right eye? For the depth sensation to work, it is important that the image matches the eye that is seeing it. For example, if you open just your left eye, you will see D(L), and if you open just your right eye, you will see D(R).

It is important that the separation does not go beyond the actual space between your eyes or you will experience something called "divergence", or encourage your eyes to point uncomfortably apart from each other. Also, the space shown in this diagram is exaggerated in two respects. First, the separation is usually no more than an inch to two inches apart for distant objects. Second, when the images have the same separation as the distance between your eyes, it is as though you are looking into infinity which is unlikely to happen in your video game experience.

P(R) and P(L) is also the same box, but if you were wearing 3D glasses, it would appear to be popping out at you! How is this feat accomplished? If you look at boxes P(R) and P(L), their perspectives are crossed from D(L) and D(R) – everything is opposite! If you opened just your right eye, you will see P(R), and if you open just your left eye, you will see P(L). In both cases, these are opposite perspectives of where your eyes are accustomed to seeing things.

Separation impacts this pop-out effect too, and the space between P(R) and P(L) tends to be less than D(L) and D(R) because the pop-out will be distracting and unattractive if overused.

When you are using your stereoscopic 3D solution, you will have the flexibility to choose where line S or "Zero Parallax" is so you can have the 3D experience that is right for you.