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MTBS3D It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia goes #VR 360 tonight! @alwayssunny #SunnyFXX #VirtualRealityhttps://t.co/gk9mJcVoxo
MTBS3D On this week's show #Zenimax vs #Oculus verdict, and an interview with Tero Sarkkinen, Founder of @BasemarkLtd! #VRhttps://t.co/kbQHe39HI4
MTBS3D Judgement Served With a $500 Million Bill For Oculus. #Oculus #Facebook #ZeniMax #VR https://t.co/gKRTZ77K0a https://t.co/Dri0lGKysG
MTBS3D Bertrand Nepveu of @Vrvana talked with us about their latest HMD upgrades at @CES. #CES2017 #VR #AR #MixedRealityhttps://t.co/R6HEQL6Uw3
MTBS3D .@panasonic discussed their new 220 degree FOV VR HMD with us at @CES. #CES2017 #Panasonic #VR #VirtualRealityhttps://t.co/0PW67eaKIp
MTBS3D .@NGCodec is working on a cloud-based #VR platform. They showed us the potential at @CES. @OlyG #CES2017https://t.co/odlHIRIDZm
MTBS3D We interviewed @SamsungCanada's Chief Marketing Officer at @CES. #CES2017 #GearVR #Oculus #VR #VirtualRealityhttps://t.co/F2HKIiFw1L
MTBS3D We spoke w/@ImmerVision at @CES. They make 360 panamorph lenses for several leading 360 camera systems. #CES2017https://t.co/1hyfeHziTK
MTBS3D We spoke w/@ImmerVision at @CES. They make 360 panamorph lenses for several leading 360 camera systems. #CES2017https://t.co/age4LhRIvp
MTBS3D We spoke to Mark Childs, Chief Marketing Officer for @SamsungCanada at @CES. #CES2017 #GearVR #Oculus #VRhttps://t.co/wsb07lv6OP
MTBS3D We spoke to @kwikvr_sgx about their new tetherless #VR enabling prototype at @CES. #CES2017 #VirtualRealityhttps://t.co/4E6FjFtngQ
MTBS3D We interviewed @GoTouchVR at @CES about their new haptics device prototype for #VirtualReality devices. #CES2017https://t.co/gDHX3dVi48
MTBS3D RT @Robertsmania: Still freaks me out to see myself on videos... Do I really sound like that?!? #VR #SimRacing @MTBS3D #CES2017 https://t.…
MTBS3D We spoke with @htc at @CES about their new audio add-on for the @htcvive, Vive Port, #VR arcades & more! #CES2017https://t.co/dT7nfuGrAw
MTBS3D We spoke to @FibrumVR at @CES about their HMDs for mobile phones and growing ecosystem of games! #CES2017 #VRhttps://t.co/BShIoaqHZi
MTBS3D .@AMD spoke with us at @CES about the long awaited Vega GPU architecture coming up around the bend! #CES2017 #AMDhttps://t.co/pRCSkHHSfj
MTBS3D @DARKFiB3R Have you received it yet?

LG Thrill / LG Optimus 3D - AT&T

Today I will be reviewing the LG Thrill 3D Phone, which I will say I've had to pleasure to own since it's release. My initial bias against LG as a company was fairly bad. I've owned a phone from LG many years ago which didn't work quite as expected. It was a Windows Mobile 6.5 phone, that wasn't as good as other phones that were available at the time. Now, I have to say LG has really stepped up to the plate with the LG Thrill.
LG Optimus 3D Photo Sample
The phone is built solid. This is a fast and stable performer for games and apps, unlike some of the other android-based phones I've owned in the past. The company has even released an update for a newer Android OS for the phone. My experience with other companies is they usually release the phone and completely forget about their customers the next day. This didn't happen with LG!
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Numbersix's BenQ XL2420TX Monitor


Overview
 
The XL2420TX is BenQ’s newest and top of the line stereoscopic gaming monitor.  It’s marketed, however, as an FPS gaming monitor due to its 120hz refresh rate and unique features targeted squarely at the FPS market – specifically CounterStrike players.
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Review - Mortal Kombat (2011)

Game: Mortal Kombat (2011)
Format: PS3
Display: Sony KDL 40NX710

NOTE – Screenshots and footage were captured using a digital camera. The game looks far clearer than the examples shown here.

Mortal Kombat 9Released in 2011, the ninth iteration in the Mortal Kombat series is a return to form for the franchise. It sees the game returning to its 2D fighting roots with all the trademark over-the-top violence the brand is famous for, but with stunning current-gen graphics and the ability to play in stereo 3D, making it arguably the best Mortal Kombat game thus far. But does it take full advantage of its 3D capabilities?

One wouldn’t necessarily imagine that a side-scrolling game would translate that well into stereoscopic 3D. Surely the limits of the 2D plane found in many fighting games or platformers means that you’re not going to gain much from a bit of depth in the background scenery, right? Well, Trine 2 and the recently released Rayman Origins on PC have both made it clear that the results can be spectacular. In a perfect world, Mortal Kombat would be another title in that list, but unfortunately the 3D in this game is so poor that it is better played with it turned off… a shame really, because handled well it could have been something special. So where does it go wrong?

The main problem is that the game uses what some refer to as “fake” 3D, or more accurately “2D-plus-depth” to create the stereoscopic effect. Because the current generation of consoles are not always powerful enough to render out the same shot twice, required for 3D, yet still keep the game looking as good as it does in 2D, different techniques are used to give the impression of 3D while saving on processing power. These techniques lead to problems in other areas though, and can often lead to an unsatisfactory gaming experience.

Basically, the “2D-plus-depth” method involves rendering out a single image (instead of the two that would normally be rendered out for “true” stereoscopic 3D), calculating how far away each pixel is from the viewer, then finally creating a second image by applying that data to the first image by shifting each pixel left or right slightly depending on its calculated depth. Now there are blank spaces left behind from where the pixels have been relocated. The computer then guesses how to fill them. This often results in foreground objects being surrounded by a warping effect as the computer tries to fill in the space created behind the offset foreground object.

The following videos demonstrate the artefacts:

Look at the leading edge of Baraka (left) as he moves back and forth. Distortion is clearly visible, especially around the face and shoulder areas.


Close-up highlighting the distortion due to the “2D-plus-depth” technique. View in 2D to see the effect even more clearly.

In games, there are some effects that cope particularly poorly with being converted to 3D using this method. Some have no depth at all.  Elements such as smoke or heat haze, for example, often render at the depth of the object behind them due to their having no solid physical presence in the scene. Particle effects such as sparks or snow, which involve lots of small shapes flying about the scene, also stress the technique. Deficiencies such as these break the immersion that playing in stereoscopic 3D is meant to create, and can be very distracting once the player notices them.

Mortal Kombat 9Upon activating the 3D, it’s apparent that the maximum depth setting is kept extremely low in order to avoid as many of the “2D-plus-depth” anomalies as possible. At such a low level it begs the question whether it is worth playing the game in 3D at all, as the artefacts are still visible, and visuals are compromised by lowering the resolution to maintain a decent frame-rate.

The characters are all rendered in flat form – a missed opportunity, as the detail on some of the character models is amazing. Some levels are more effective than others in 3D. The Pit II, which has the characters fighting on a moonlit bridge, are quite good; while others, such as the Goro’s Lair, have almost no depth, apart from some lanterns that pop out of the screen as they scroll past along the bottom. The lanterns intersect with the special Power-Up Bars which are rendered at screen-level – also very annoying. Most stages have depth issues of some kind, and many special moves have effects that are rendered at the wrong depth level, such as Johnny Cage’s fireballs which seem to be rendered at screen depth, although at such low maximum depth levels it’s difficult to tell.

Mortal Kombat 9Mortal Kombat 9Mortal Kombat 9Mortal Kombat 9The story mode in Mortal Kombat has been a large talking point, mainly due to the fact that it is one of the few fighting games to actually have one worth playing. Each character’s story follows on from the previous character, so the player gets a turn at most of the fighters by the end of the game. Unfortunately, the story mode is where the 3D is most obviously lacking. Some cut scenes aren’t even rendered in 3D, and those that are have terrible depth issues such as the top of a mountain appearing disconnected from the bottom half in a section of Johnny Cage’s story.

Mortal Kombat 9Notice the strange depth anomalies in the tree behind Sonya
The tragedy is that there are occasional glimpses of what this game could have been. There’s a level in the Challenge Tower that has your character fighting while dodging projectiles being fired at you from the distance. This really added to the immersion and excitement as they came straight towards the screen, but moments like these were few and far between. Mortal Kombat is still a fantastic title and I highly recommend it. Just keep the 3D turned off.

Actual Game: 10/10
Stereoscopic 3D: 2/10
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