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MTBS3D Interview with @HP on the debut of Sprout2 easily one of the most amazing things we saw at @CES! #CES2017https://t.co/qalhv4DGN4
MTBS3D .@GIGABYTEUSA has a big commitment to #VR and talked with us about it at @CES! #CES2017 #VirtualReality https://t.co/bFsqPfIdWZ
MTBS3D We interviewed 9D #VirtualReality Room at @CES on their shared #VR machine for out of home experiences! #CES2017 https://t.co/d2bgTuRVH8
MTBS3D .@GIGABYTEUSA has a big commitment to #VR and talked with us about it at @CES! #CES2017 #VirtualRealityhttps://t.co/IMvhXDOryy
MTBS3D We interviewed 9D #VirtualReality Room at @CES on their shared #VR machine for out of home experiences! #CES2017 https://t.co/d2bgTuRVH8
MTBS3D Interview with @HumanEyesTech about their new 3D 360 #VR camera for consumers from @CES! #CES2017 #VirtualRealityhttps://t.co/DxemL1V31N
MTBS3D Interview with @HumanEyesTech about their new 3D 360 #VR camera for consumers from @CES! #CES2017 #VirtualRealityhttps://t.co/bi8wznPnPu
MTBS3D Check out Neil's @CES interview with @lenovo talking about their new mixed reality HMD! #VR #AR #MixedRealityhttps://t.co/Pskz80LSSi
MTBS3D @Robertsmania @Arclegger Kris, tell Neil that I definitely need this!! 😂
MTBS3D RT @Robertsmania: All the new Vive toys! TPCast Wireless link, Tracker, Headphones and VivePort @htcvive @MTBS3D #VR #CES2017 https://t.co/
MTBS3D RT @Robertsmania: Exciting enthusiast class Vega GPU at @AMD @MTBS3D #VR #CES2017 https://t.co/hAllLdsxcU
MTBS3D RT @Robertsmania: Self contained HMD with six degree of freedom tracking from https://t.co/dF4MeWgdRs @MTBS3D #VR #CES2017 https://t.co/nEX
MTBS3D RT @Robertsmania: 8K #VR HMD from Pimax. Very clear and wide fov @Mtbs3d #CES2017 https://t.co/A1tQbAKBGS
MTBS3D @Robertsmania @Arclegger .@Robertsmania Tell Neil to bring one of these home for us!

GameGradeVR Certification Categories

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Certification


GameGradeVR is an online database of PC games and their level of compatibility with different software and hardware solutions on the market.  It is completely gamer driven, and the scoring criteria are 100% objective in nature so all submissions will hold up to public scrutiny.

When a gamer makes a submission, they are asked a series of questions about the game, its VR experience, what eye candy features need to be turned off (if any), and the level of stereoscopic 3D and VR flexibility they have at their disposal.

General Quality Assurance

The first part of the score is the Quality Assurance (QA) portion.  All games begin with a QA score of 100%, and get deductions for reduced graphics settings, VR settings, and remaining anomalies.  Reduced graphics settings refer to “eye candy” features that need to be turned off so the game can be played without visual problems or head tracking incompatibilities.  This is not related to performance saving measures that are required to play the game fast enough.  If the remaining score is passable, games are rated as Bronze, Silver, Gold, and Platinum.  The scores required for each level are as follows:

Platinum
DDD Gold iZ3D Bronze Nvidia Silver Native Silver Certification
    Quality assurance score is 100%.


    Gold
    DDD Gold iZ3D Bronze Nvidia Silver Native Silver Certification
    • Quality assurance score ranges from 85% - 99%.

    Silver
    DDD Silver iZ3D Bronze Nvidia Silver Native Silver Certification
    • Quality assurance score ranges from 65%-84%.

    Bronze
    DDD Bronze iZ3D Bronze Nvidia Bronze Native Bronze Certification

    Quality Assurane score ranges from 25%-64%


    Uncertified

    Uncertified

     One or more critical errors AND/OR remaining quality assurance score of 0% to 24%


    Visual Flexibility

    The second part of the score is related to visual flexibility.  Out of screen effects are a little harder to define with head mounted displays, but they refer to the point of "convergence" or when the left/right eye images overlap.  While visual flexibility is not treated as a QA deduction, GGVR is designed so that gamers will see which titles offer the VR options they are looking for, and what trade-offs are needed to attain that flexibility.

    Grade A

    Grade A offers the most flexibility.  The game can be played with maximum "eye candy" settings and there are no discernable artifacts or anomalies when played in a combined depth and pop-out experience as described in MTBS' Stereoscopic 3D Settings Guide.

    Some driver developers force certain eye candy settings off, despite what is adjusted in the game.  This would NOT qualify for a Platinum grade.

    Grade B

    The game can be played with a combined depth and pop-out experience and there are no visual anomalies.  However, the game does require one or more "eye candy" settings to be turned off (e.g. bloom, HDR lighting, depth of field, glow, etc.).  Drivers that forcibly turn game settings off would fall in this category as well.  For example, shadows that are turned on in the game, but don't actually appear in stereoscopic 3D or VR mode.

    Grade C


    While the game can be played with a combined depth and pop-out experience, some non-critical visual anomalies remain.  The game may or may not require one or more "eye candy" settings to be turned off (e.g. bloom, HDR lighting, field of view, glow, etc.).

    Grade D

    This is the lowest level of visual flexibility.  The game is either designed to be played this way, or a "depth only" situation is required because it will otherwise be plagued by critical anomalies and visual errors.  The game may or may not require one or more "eye candy" settings to be turned off (e.g. bloom, HDR lighting, field of view, glow, etc.) as well.  This would also apply to native games that prevent the images from crossing over, or clip the image at just the point when this would naturally happen.